100 years since the WW1 Armistice, Remembrance Day remains a powerful reminder of the cost of war

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Abstract

On November 11 1918, aboard Marshall Ferdinand Foch’s train carriage, a few plenipotentiaries of Germany and the main Allied nations signed a short document that ordered a ceasefire, effective from 11am. In doing so, they put an end to the global carnage that had started in August 1914 and had killed more than 10 million combatants and 6 million civilians.
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
PublisherThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 9 Nov 2018

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