A case study exploring video access by students: Wrangling and visualising data for measuring digital behaviour

Timna Garnett, Didy Button

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
84 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Every click made by a student is being captured by our learning platforms and integrated web-based tools. This store of data acts as, in its simplest form, part of an individuals’ digital behaviour with measurable points of interest. But how can this data give teachers an indication that our energy, time and potentially money spent making educational videos is worth the investment? Do-It-Yourself (DIY) videos are more commonly being made by teachers to replace written or face-to-face spoken content, provide an alternative instruction format or provide assessment feedback, to name just a few. This paper explores how we can help answer the most common question asked by teachers who undertake DIY video creation: are DIY educational videos being accessed by students? To answer this question, usage data generated by Moodle (student access point) and YouTube (video host) was collected. Simple analysis tools were employed to make sense of the typical log points generated by each system. Using a first year nursing subject as a case study, this project compared student access behaviour of pre-recorded one hour weekly video lectures. The results indicated an overall declining trend in viewing the video content online throughout the semester yet an increased video access when videos are presented in small segments assembled in YouTube playlists. An additional important outcome of this study was learning and sharing how to wrangle Moodle logs and YouTube Analytics data by non-statistical experts to quickly visualise video access. This information may ultimately support video creators to evaluate their videos, spend their time more efficiently when initially making videos, support decisions to change content or update curriculum, and to ultimately re-evaluate the role videos play in learning and teaching online environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages225-230
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016
Event33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2016: Show me the learning - University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 27 Nov 201630 Nov 2016

Conference

Conference33rd International Conference of Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2016
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period27/11/1630/11/16

Bibliographical note

The author(s) assign a Creative Commons by attribution licence enabling others to distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon their work, even commercially, as long as credit is given to the author(s) for the original creation. CC BY-NC-SA

Keywords

  • Digital behaviour
  • Learning analytics
  • Learning design

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