A comparison of oral narratives in children with specific language and non-specific language impairment

Wendy Pearce, Deborah James, Paul McCormack

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This research investigated whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) and non-specific language impairment (NLI) could be differentiated by their oral narrative characteristics. Oral narrative samples were collected from 69 children and comparisons were made among four groups of participants. The two language impairment groups (SLI and NLI), aged 4;116;03, were matched for age and their linguistics skills. Their oral narratives were compared between these diagnostic groups and with age-matched and language-matched control groups. Measures of narrative structure, cohesion, and information did not significantly differentiate the SLI and NLI groups, suggesting that the influence of their similar linguistic skills on oral narrative measures was stronger than the influence of their differing non-verbal cognition. The SLI group produced significantly more complex and informative oral narratives than the language-matched group, while the NLI group differed from the language-matched group on fewer measures. Interactions among linguistic, cognitive, maturational, and task factors are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)622-645
    Number of pages24
    JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
    Volume24
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

    Keywords

    • Differential diagnosis
    • Non-specific language impairment
    • Oral narrative
    • Specific language impairment

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparison of oral narratives in children with specific language and non-specific language impairment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this