A critical examination of Australian youth case management: Compounding governing spaces and infantilising self-management

Ben Lohmeyer, Joel McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Case management is promoted as a trademark of community service practice with young people funded by neoliberal social policy. In spite of this, case management practice and case managers have largely escaped the attention of youth scholars. In this paper, we examine the funding parameters of two youth case management services in Australia to reveal the governing effects on young people, case managers and NGOs. We develop an analytical framework that exposes the compounding effect of interacting governable spaces that facilitates a critical analysis of case management revealing the problems of governance within this seemingly generic practice method. Shifting focus from the young person as the object of governance to include the case manager and case management as separate but interacting governable spaces, provides new insights into the problematisations underpinning case management practice with young people. We argue compounding governable spaces provides insight into the infantilisation of young people that is amplified and reinforced within and between case managers, and case management.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Youth Studies
Early online date7 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Case management
  • Flexible Learning Options
  • Joint Support Program
  • compounding governing spaces
  • infantilisation
  • neoliberalism

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