A Descriptive Study of the Fluid Intake, Hydration, and Health Status of Rehabilitation Inpatients without Dysphagia Following Stroke

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Abstract

Adequate hydration is important for all people, particularly when hospitalized with illness. Individuals with dysphagia following stroke are considered to be at risk of inadequate fluid intake and, therefore, dehydration, but there is little information about the fluid intake or hydration of individuals without dysphagia poststroke. This cohort study measured the average beverage intake, calculated the urea/creatinine ratio as a measure of hydration, and documented specific health outcomes of 86 people without dysphagia poststroke who were inpatients in rehabilitation centers. Participants drank on average 1504 ml per day (SD 359 ml), which typically represented 67% of their estimated daily requirement. Approximately 44% of the participants in the sample were dehydrated based on a blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio >20:1. Sixteen percent of participants were diagnosed with one or more of the health outcomes of dehydration/hypernatremia, urinary tract infection, or constipation. A greater level of dependence was associated with poorer beverage intake and higher risk of an adverse health outcome. Those in the older/elderly age range (particularly older women) and those with poor mobility were most at risk of poor hydration. This study highlights that patients in rehabilitation facilities poststroke, even without dysphagia, may be at risk of suboptimal fluid intake and hydration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-304
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2015

Keywords

  • deglutition disorders
  • hydration
  • rehabilitation
  • stroke
  • water-electrolyte imbalance

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