A finite element study on the mechanical response of the head-neck interface of hip implants under realistic forces and moments of daily activities: Part 1, level walking

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    Abstract

    This paper investigates the mechanical response of a modular head-neck interface of hip joint implants under realistic loads of level walking. The realistic loads of the walking activity consist of three dimensional gait forces and the associated frictional moments. These forces and moments were extracted for a 32 mm metal-on-metal bearing couple. A previously reported geometry of a modular CoCr/CoCr head-neck interface with a proximal contact was used for this investigation. An explicit finite element analysis was performed to investigate the interface mechanical responses. To study the level of contribution and also the effect of superposition of the load components, three different scenarios of loading were studied: gait forces only, frictional moments only, and combined gait forces and frictional moments. Stress field, micro-motions, shear stresses and fretting work at the contacting nodes of the interface were analysed. Gait forces only were found to significantly influence the mechanical environment of the head-neck interface by temporarily extending the contacting area (8.43% of initially non-contacting surface nodes temporarily came into contact), and therefore changing the stress field and resultant micro-motions during the gait cycle. The frictional moments only did not cause considerable changes in the mechanical response of the interface (only 0.27% of the non-contacting surface nodes temporarily came into contact). However, when superposed with the gait forces, the mechanical response of the interface, particularly micro-motions and fretting work, changed compared to the forces only case. The normal contact stresses and micro-motions obtained from this realistic load-controlled study were typically in the range of 0–275 MPa and 0–38 µm, respectively. These ranges were found comparable to previous experimental displacement-controlled pin/cylinder-on-disk fretting corrosion studies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)470-476
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
    Volume75
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017

    Keywords

    • Contact stresses
    • Fretting work
    • Head-neck taper junction
    • Hip implants
    • Micro-motions
    • Walking

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