A high-resolution tape sensor improves the accuracy of applied pressure profiles during lower-leg bandaging – results from a study using a fibre-optic sensing tape

Luke Parkinson, Malou Van Zanten, Neil Piller, John Arkwright

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Compression bandaging is a mainstay practice in the treatment of conditions such as chronic wounds and lymphoedema. However, the ability of practitioners to measure bandage application to a desired pressure profile is difficult because of sensor limitations. We have used a novel fibre-optic-based, high-resolution sub-bandage pressure monitor to measure adherence to a target pressure gradient during compression bandaging. Participants of various experience (n = 46) were asked to bandage a lower-leg manikin to a gradient of 40 (ankle) to 20 mmHg (proximal calf) in both a blinded trial and subsequently with sensor feedback. Mean pressures across all sensors for both the blind and sensor-guided trials approximated a target mean of 30 mmHg. However, the mean gradient achieved in the blinded trial showed an inverse pressure gradient to the target with a high-pressure region at the mid-calf (44 ± 19 mmHg). Correlation to the target gradient improved from R2 = 0·62 during the blind trial to 0·93 using sensor feedback, with a gradient that closely approximated the target. This demonstrates the use of high-resolution sub-bandage pressure sensing in improving the ability of practitioners to achieve a target pressure gradient in compression bandaging for clinical use and training.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)973-977
    Number of pages5
    JournalInternational Wound Journal
    Volume14
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017

    Keywords

    • Bio-interface pressure
    • Compression bandaging
    • Fibre-optic sensors
    • Lymphoedema

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