A Longitudinal Study of Chronic Periodontitis in Two Cohorts of Community-Dwelling Elderly Australians

Xiangqun Ju, Jane Harford, Liana Luzzi, Gloria Mejia, Lisa M. Jamieson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: The study aimed to estimate and compare the incidence and progression of chronic periodontitis among two generations of older Australian adults. Methods: Data were from two population-based cohort studies of Australian older adults aged 60+ years South Australian Dental Longitudinal Studies (SADLS), SADLS I (1991–1992) and SADLS II (2013–2014). American Academy of Periodontology/the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC/AAP), and the 2018 European Federation of Periodontology classification (EFP/AAP) case definitions were used to define and calculate the incidence and progression of chronic periodontitis. Multivariable Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence risk ratios (IRRs) of periodontitis. Results: A total 567 and 201 dentate respondents had periodontal exams in SADLS I and II, respectively. The incidence rate was greater in SADLS II than in SADLS I, approximately 200 vs. 100/1000 person years, respectively. Current smokers had more than two times higher IRRs, 2.38 (1.30–4.34) and 2.30 (1.24–4.26), than their non-smoking counterparts in the previous generation under the CDC/AAP and EFP/AAP, respectively. Conclusions: The most recent generation of older adults has greater incidence and progression of periodontitis than the previous generation. Being a current tobacco smoker was a significant risk factor for both the incidence and progression of periodontitis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11824
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume19
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Sept 2022

Keywords

  • clinical attachment level (CAL)
  • gingival recession (GR)
  • incidence
  • periodontitis
  • probing pocket depth (PPD)
  • tooth loss

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