A new framework for interpreting contact rock art reassessing the rock art at Nackara springs: Reassessing the rock art at Nackara Springs, South Australia

Claire Smith, Jordan Ralph, Kylie Lower, Jennifer McKinnon, Matthew Ebbs, Vincent Copley Senior

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter addresses the challenge of seeing beyond the motif. Based on a case study in the Mid North of South Australia, this chapter presents a new analytical framework for analyzing style in rock art and using stylistic characteristics to identify authorship. The framework can be customized to different sites and/or regions to provide more nuanced understandings of specific contact trajectories. The results of this study suggest that innovation in contact rock art initially occurs in a single aspect of style and that a sequencing of innovations may be able to provide a temporal succession for contact motifs. The wider value of this framework is that it provides a basis for developing regional or site-specific models of style that may help researchers obtain greater insight into the authorship of contact rock art in different parts of the world.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology and Anthropology of Rock Art
EditorsBruno David, Ian J. McNiven
PublisherOxford University Press
Chapter25
Pages587-610
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9780190607357
ISBN (Print)9780190607357
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • contact
  • rock art
  • archaeological theory and method
  • style
  • Indigenous archaeology
  • Archaeological theory and method
  • Style
  • Contact
  • Rock art

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