A new model for coastal resource productivity and sea-level change: The role of physical sedimentary processes in assessing the archaeological potential of submerged landscapes from the Northwest Australian continental shelf

Ingrid Ward, Piers Larcombe, Peter Veth

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Existing models of coastal occupation, in one form or another, embrace the assumption that changes in mean sea level were the prime driver for shifts in coastal resource productivity of consequence to coastal foragers. Focusing on the North West Shelf of Australia, this paper considers the role of physical sedimentary processes in understanding both past coastal resource productivity and the archaeology of drowned coastal landscapes. From a review of up-to-date literature on sea-level related coastal formation process related to the North West Shelf, we describe the complex interplay of sea-level change and sedimentary processes in determining (i) coastal resource availability, and (ii) archaeological site preservation potential through time. We argue that human behavioral models that have been linked solely to changes in sea level change from ca. 45 ka onward along the Australia continental shelf have inadequately accounted for local sedimentary regimes. It is not past sea-level per se, which is of relevance to coastal productivity and human behavioral ecology models but changes in tidal regimes, coastal configurations and sedimentation. We conclude that our understanding of maritime adaptations for Sahul (Greater Australia) remain incomplete without investigating former coastlines and archaeological information that now lies submerged offshore.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)19-31
    Number of pages13
    JournalGeoarchaeology-An International Journal
    Volume30
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

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