A population survey found an association between self-reports of traumatic brain injury and increased psychiatric symptoms

Kaarin J. Anstey, Peter Butterworth, Anthony F. Jorm, Helen Christensen, Bryan Rodgers, Timothy D. Windsor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective This study determined whether self-reported Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), identified in a community sample and occurring up to 60 years previously, is associated with current psychiatric symptoms, suicidality, and psychologic well-being. Study design and setting Three age cohorts (20-24, 40-44, 60-64) were randomly sampled from the cities of Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia, yielding a total of 7,485 participants. The samples were administered scales measuring anxiety, depression, suicidality, positive and negative affect, personality traits, and physical health status. Results Of the total sample, 5.7% reported history of TBI involving loss of consciousness for at least 15 min, occurring an average of 22 years previously. History of TBI was associated with increased symptoms of depression, anxiety, negative affect, and suicidal ideation. Conclusion History of TBI is a risk factor for psychiatric morbidity. The effect is greatest in young adults, and occurs up to several decades subsequent to the occurrence of TBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1202-1209
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume57
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Epidemiology
  • Suicide
  • Traumatic brain injury

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