A pragmatic effectiveness study of 10-session cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-T) for eating disorders: Targeting barriers to treatment provision

Mia L. Pellizzer, Glenn Waller, Tracey D. Wade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Ten-session cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-T) for transdiagnostic eating disorders targets several barriers to treatment, including cost, therapist expertise, and lengthy wait lists. Method: We used a case series design to investigate the effectiveness of CBT-T delivered by trainee psychologists in a postgraduate training clinic. Participants were randomly allocated to commence treatment either immediately or after a 4-week waitlist period. CBT-T was delivered to 52 patients, by six different trainees under supervision. Measures of eating disorder cognitions and behaviours, quality of life, and general psychopathology were examined in completer and intention-to-treat analyses using multilevel modelling. Last observation carried forward was applied for abstinence, remission, and good outcome analyses to aid comparison with prior studies. Results: Significant improvements, associated with medium to large effect sizes, were found for eating disorder cognitions, behaviours quality of life, and negative affect from baseline to posttreatment, and at 1- and 3-month follow-up. Attrition (38.5%) was comparable with other treatment studies. Conclusion: Results provide evidence for the effectiveness of CBT-T delivered by trainee psychologists for transdiagnostic eating disorder patients, thus tackling some important barriers for treatment. Longer follow-up, randomised controlled trial designs, and moderator analyses will provide more robust evidence about which patients do best with a shorter therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-570
Number of pages14
JournalEuropean Eating Disorders Review
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

Keywords

  • abstinence
  • cognitive behavioural therapy
  • eating disorders
  • intensive
  • remission

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