A qualitative study of the attitudes to teamwork of graduates from a traditional and an integrated undergraduate medical course

Sarah Willis, Alison Jones, Patricia McArdle, Paul A O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In 1994 the University of Manchester medical school introduced an integrated undergraduate course using problem-based learning throughout. This study explores
differences between the new and old (traditional) course graduates’ attitudes to, and conceptualization of, teamwork.
Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 graduates of the traditional course (graduating in 1998) and 23 from the new course (1999 graduates), representing approximately 14%
of graduates from each cohort. Theories were then developed from concepts emerging from the data.
Results: The new course graduates (NCGs) had a broader view of members of a health professional team. The NCGs believed that the medical team should provide support and were more comfortable
consulting them when faced with problems.
Conclusions: The new curriculum has had some impact on conceptualization and attitude to teamwork. However, further development is required if graduates are to see themselves as part of a multi-professional team.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-148
Number of pages10
JournalAdvances in Health Sciences Education
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2003
Externally publishedYes

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