A randomized controlled trial of cyclosporine withdrawal in renal-transplant recipients: 15-Year results

Martin P. Gallagher, Bruce M. Hall, Jonathan Craig, Geoffrey Berry, David John Tiller, Josette Marie Eris

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74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. In renal transplantation, the immunosuppressive efficacy of cyclosporine is counterbalanced by its nephrotoxicity. Although cyclosporine improves short-term graft survival, its long-term effects are unclear.

Methods. Recipients of first cadaver renal transplants were randomized into three groups between 1983 and 1986: azathioprine and prednisolone alone (AP, n=158), long term cyclosporine alone (Cy, n=166), and short-term cyclosporine followed by azathioprine and prednisolone (CyAP, n=165). All groups received methylprednisolone induction.

Results. There were no significant differences in patient survival at 15 years (48 vs. 56 vs. 51%, P=0.14), and 15-year graft survival (censored for death) in those patients in the CyAP group (47 vs. 44 vs. 59%, P=0.06) was not significantly different statistically. When deaths or graft losses before 12 months were censored, the differences in 15-year graft survival between the groups were significant (58%, 51%, 70%, P=0.01). The CyAP group also had lower mean serum creatinine at all time points beyond 3 months posttransplant out to 10 years (143 vs. 169 vs. 131 [mu]moles/L, P=0.04). Per protocol analysis, after censoring patients at change in therapy, increased the observed differences in 15-year graft survival between the groups (54 vs. 38 vs. 65%, P=0.01).

Conclusion. Survival and function of first cadaveric kidney transplants is improved by use of short-term cyclosporine followed by azathioprine and prednisolone. Long-term cyclosporine use reduces long-term graft survival.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1653-1660
Number of pages8
JournalTransplantation
Volume78
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Kidney transplantation
  • Cyclosporine
  • Graft survival

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