A review of the use of transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange for patients undergoing surgery in the shared airway setting

Lucy Huang, Nuwan Dharmawardana, Adam Badenoch, Eng H. Ooi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) is a recent technique that delivers warm humidified high flow oxygen to patients, allowing for prolonged apneic oxygenation. A review of current literature was performed to determine the use of THRIVE in apneic patients undergoing surgery in a shared airway setting. An initial free hand search was done to identify keywords followed by a systematic search of major databases with no date or language restrictions. Inclusion criteria include all apneic patients who receive THRIVE for any operative procedure. Fifteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. There were ten case series, two case reports, two review articles and one randomized controlled trial. All of the studies discussed the use of THRIVE during laryngopharyngeal surgeries. The median apnea time reported ranged between 13 and 27 min. There were no significant complications reported as a result of using THRIVE. Most studies identified in this review were observational in nature involving laryngopharyngeal procedures. They have demonstrated THRIVE to be effective in providing apneic oxygenation during short procedures in adult patients. Further studies are required to determine the limitations of safe use in specific populations and when THRIVE is combined with diathermy or laser use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134-143
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Anesthesia
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Apneic oxygenation
  • High flow nasal oxygen
  • Laryngeal surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • THRIVE

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