A Salute to our Placoderm Pioneers: The first time vertebrates had sex

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

With the help of extremely rare, well-preserved fossils, we can trace complicated sexual behaviours back to ancient armoured fishes called placoderms.

Whether it is the conspicuous and cumbersome tail feathers of a peacock or the boisterous and bloody battles of male elephant seals, sex undoubtedly comes at a cost. Finding a mate can use up a lot of energy and involves taking risks. From an evolutionary point of view, sex is not an efficient way of sharing genes, passing only 50 percent of a parent’s genetic material on to the next generation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSydney Brenner's 10-on-10
Subtitle of host publicationThe Chronicles of Evolution
EditorsShuzhen Sim , Benjamin Seet
PublisherWildtype Books
Chapter8
Pages97-107
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9789811187186, 9789811188312
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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