A study on the natural history of scanning behaviour in patients with visual field defects after stroke

Tobias Loetscher, Celia Chen, Sophie Wignall, Andreas Bulling, Sabrina Hoppe, Owen Churches, Nicole Thomas, Michael Nicholls, Andrew Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: A visual field defect (VFD) is a common consequence of stroke with a detrimental effect upon the survivors' functional ability and quality of life. The identification of effective treatments for VFD is a key priority relating to life post-stroke. Understanding the natural evolution of scanning compensation over time may have important ramifications for the development of efficacious therapies. Methods/Design: Eye-tracking glasses are used to delineate eye movements in a cohort of 100 stroke patients immediately after stroke, and additionally at 6 and 12 months post-stroke. The longitudinal study will assess eye movements in static (sitting) and dynamic (walking) conditions. Discussion: The longitudinal comparison of patients who do and do not learn compensatory scanning techniques may reveal important prognostic markers of natural recovery. Importantly, it may also help to determine the most effective treatment window for visual rehabilitation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number64
    JournalBMC Neurology
    Volume15
    Issue number64
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2015

    Keywords

    • Dynamic assessment
    • Eye tracking
    • Hemianopia
    • Longitudinal
    • Stroke
    • Walking

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A study on the natural history of scanning behaviour in patients with visual field defects after stroke'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this