A systematic review and meta-Analysis of the prevalence of poor sleep in inflammatory bowel disease

Alex Barnes, Reme Mountifield, Justin Baker, Paul Spizzo, Peter Bampton, Jane M. Andrews, Robert J. Fraser, Sutapa Mukherjee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Study Objectives: Poor sleep-in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with worse quality of life, along with anxiety, depression, and fatigue. This meta-Analysis aimed to determine the pooled prevalence of poor sleep-in IBD. Methods: Electronic databases were searched for publications from inception to November 1st 2021. Poor sleep was defined according to subjective sleep measures. A random effects model was used to determine the pooled prevalence of poor sleep-in people with IBD. Heterogeneity was investigated through subgroup analysis and meta-regression. Publication bias was assessed by funnel plot and Egger's test. Results: 519 Studies were screened with 36 studies included in the meta-Analysis incorporating a total of 24 209 people with IBD. Pooled prevalence of poor sleep-in IBD was 56%, 95% CI (51-61%) with significant heterogeneity. The prevalence did not differ based on the definition of poor sleep. Meta-regression was significant for increased prevalence of poor sleep with increase in age and increased of prevalence of poor sleep with objective IBD activity but not subjective IBD activity, depression, or disease duration. Conclusions: Poor sleep is common in people with IBD. Further research is warranted to investigate if improving sleep quality in people with IBD will improve IBD activity and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberzpac025
Number of pages10
JournalSLEEP Advances
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • immune function
  • insomnia
  • sleep deprivation

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