A time for change? Indigenous heritage values and management practice in the Coorong and Lower Murray Lakes region, South Australia

Lynley Wallis, Alice Gorman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Coorong and Lower Murray Lakes in South Australia have long been recognised under the Ramsar Convention for their natural heritage values. Less well known is the fact that this area also has high social and cultural values, encompassing the traditional lands and waters (ruwe) of the Ngarrindjeri Nation. This unique ecosystem is currently teetering on the verge of collapse, a situation arguably brought about by prolonged drought after decades of unsustainable management practices. While at the federal level there have been moves to better integrate typically disparate 'cultural' and 'natural' heritage management regimes - thereby supporting Indigenous groups in their attempts to gain a greater voice in how their traditional country is managed - the distance has not yet been bridged in the Coorong. Here, current management planning continues to emphasise natural heritage values, with limited practical integration of cultural values or Ngarrindjeri viewpoints. As the future of the Coorong and Lower Murray Lakes is being debated, we suggest decision makers would do well to look to the Ngarrindjeri for guidance on the integration of natural and cultural values in management regimes as a vital step towards securing the long-term ecological viability of this iconic part of Australia.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)57-73
    Number of pages17
    JournalAustralian Aboriginal Studies
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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