A Transition Strategy for Ensuring Student Success in First Year Physics

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

    Abstract

    Starting university can be quite an emotional time in a student’s life. It is a new
    adventure, and is usually accompanied by mixed feelings of excitement, expectation and much apprehension. In this paper we report on an activity day to support 1st year physics student transition at Flinders University. Essentially, the key focus is to maximise each students’ initial engagement with 1st year Physics by creating an environment for them to enjoy thinking about Physics in a positive, supportive, social setting, and thus significantly reduce any anxiety during their first week of 1st year university. In this paper we present our approach to this challenge and the measurable outcomes we have achieved so far. For the academic year 2011, we have conducted a survey on the transition day and week 4 of the first semester to measure the influence of such an event
    upon student confidence.
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Event15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference 2012: New Horizons - Sofitel Brisbane Central, Brisbane, Australia
    Duration: 26 Jun 201229 Jun 2012
    https://unistars.org/past_papers/papers12/FYHE_Proceedings.pdf (Book of Proceedings)
    https://unistars.org/proceedings/ (Links to past conferences)

    Conference

    Conference15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference 2012
    Abbreviated titleFYHE Conference 2012
    CountryAustralia
    CityBrisbane
    Period26/06/1229/06/12
    Internet address

    Keywords

    • FYHE Conference
    • UniSTARS
    • STARS Conference
    • first year experience
    • First Year Higher Education
    • first year university education
    • First year university experience
    • STEM
    • Tertiary physics

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