Aboriginal perspectives of child health and wellbeing in an urban setting: Developing a conceptual framework.

Naomi Priest, Tamara Mackean, Elise Davis, Lyn Briggs, Elizabeth Waters

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Health and wellbeing is defined internationally as a multi-dimensional and holistic concept, particularly within Indigenous worldviews. However, in Australia there is a lack of detailed frameworks supporting such definitions that are founded on Aboriginal knowledges. This study aimed to explore Aboriginal perspectives of child health and wellbeing in an urban setting. Qualitative interviews with 25 care-givers of Aboriginal children living in Melbourne, Australia were conducted. Aboriginal people and community controlled organisations were collaborative partners in all stages of the research. A conceptual framework of Aboriginal child health and wellbeing in an urban setting was developed comprising four main themes: Strong Culture; Strong Child; Strong Environment; and Strengths and Challenges. Aboriginal conceptions of culture are considered central to Aboriginal child health and wellbeing in an urban context. A holistic framework that privileges Aboriginal knowledge of child health and wellbeing has not previously been available. Further exploration of socio-ecological models within Aboriginal child health and wellbeing contexts is needed. This study identifies dimensions for further exploration in research, policy and practice.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)180-195
    Number of pages16
    JournalHealth Sociology Review
    Volume21
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • Aboriginal
    • Australia
    • Child
    • Health
    • Holistic
    • Indigenous
    • Sociology
    • Urban
    • Wellbeing

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Aboriginal perspectives of child health and wellbeing in an urban setting: Developing a conceptual framework.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this