Academic, supervisor, mentor, Mother: the emotional roller coaster of facilitating the student Work-Integrated Learning placement journey

Elizabeth Abery, Jessica Gunson

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) through industry placement undertaken outside of the university environment is becoming commonplace and in many cases an expectation of the university, the student and the future employer market (Patrick et al., 2008). While there is an abundance of literature asserting the benefits of university students’ undertaking of a WIL placement, little attention is given to the emotional aspects involved for the university placement facilitator. It has been acknowledged that teaching roles often spill over into the role of caring (Nodding, 2003; O’Connor, 2008) and students need to recognise that they are cared for and supported (Nodding, 2003). As a result, a relationship between teacher and student is likely to develop that fosters positive teaching and learning outcomes (O’Connor, 2008; Rodger, Fitzgerald, Davila, Millar, & Allison, 2011) but this requires a commitment and emotional investment from both parties (Yin & Lee, 2012). However, the caring and emotional components of the teacher’s role are often not recognised by the university, especially where other areas of productivity within the university are considered to be of higher value (Blackie, Case, & Jawitz, 2010; Constanti & Gibbs, 2004; O’Connor, 2008; Yin & Lee, 2012). Recognising the additional workload involved in WIL programs has been of recent interest, however, adequate ways to quantify and explain it remain unclear (Bates, 2011; Rowe, Clark, Cantori, & Bligin, 2013). The roles involved in facilitating a WIL placement include;
    sourcing quality placement opportunities (Rodger et al., 2011); maintaining relationships with industry partners to ensure continuing opportunities (Rowe & Winchester-Seeto, 2013); preparing students for placement;
    monitoring the progression and outcome of the placement; pastoral care; and mediation between the university, the student and the host organization particularly where expectations do not align (Rodger et al., 2011; Rowe et
    al., 2013). These roles are necessary but can be time consuming and emotionally demanding (Bates, 2011). This paper points to the valuable literature on the role of emotions in Higher Education and suggests the need to apply an emotions-based theoretical framework to more fully understand the WIL context and the relationship between staff and students.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationNew Zealand Association for Cooperative Education 2016 conference proceedings
    EditorsKarsten Zegwaard , Katharine Hoskyn
    PublisherNew Zealand Association for Cooperative Education
    Pages5-8
    Number of pages4
    ISBN (Electronic)9780473358754
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    Event19th New Zealand Association for Cooperative Education Conference,Advocacy, Collaboration, Engagement - Takapuna, New Zealand
    Duration: 20 Apr 201621 Apr 2016

    Conference

    Conference19th New Zealand Association for Cooperative Education Conference,Advocacy, Collaboration, Engagement
    Country/TerritoryNew Zealand
    CityTakapuna
    Period20/04/1621/04/16

    Keywords

    • Work Integrated Learning (WIL)
    • Industry placement
    • university students
    • placement opportunities

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Academic, supervisor, mentor, Mother: the emotional roller coaster of facilitating the student Work-Integrated Learning placement journey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this