Accuracy of self-report of on-road crashes and traffic offences in a cohort of young drivers: the DRIVE study

Soufiane Boufous, Rebecca Ivers, Teresa Senserrick, Mark Stevenson, Robyn Norton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    56 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In order to determine the accuracy of self-report of onroad crashes and traffic offences among participants in the DRIVE study, 2991 young drivers in New South Wales, Australia who completed the follow-up questionnaire were asked whether they had been involved in an on-road crash or were convicted for a traffic offence while driving during the year prior to the survey. This information was linked to police crash data to determine the level of accuracy of self-report of onroad crashes. There was a high level of accuracy in young drivers' self-report of police recorded crashes (85.1%; 95% CI 78.2% to 92.1%) and of police recorded traffic offences (83.0%; 95% CI 79.4% to 86.6%). Results suggest that surveys may be useful tools for estimating the incidence of on-road crashes and traffic offences in young drivers. The findings are particularly relevant to jurisdictions where access to administrative data is limited.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)275-277
    Number of pages3
    JournalInjury Prevention
    Volume16
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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