Acetylcholine synthesis and glucose oxidation are preserved in human brain obtained shortly after death

D. M. Bowen, N. R. Sims, K. A.P. Lee, K. L. Marek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The incorporation of [U-14C]glucose into acetylcholine (ACh) by tissue prisms incubated in a high K+ medium is unexpectedly well preserved in human brain obtained 30-45 min after death. The assay of this rare material provides the first data on ACh synthesis, as well as overall glucose oxidation (assessed by trapping 14CO2), in non-neocortical regions of human brain. The rates of ACh synthesis were similar in the hippocampus and neocortex (except for occipital lobe material which was low in cholinergic activity), whereas synthesis was approximately 4-fold higher in the caudate nucleus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-199
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience letters
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Aug 1982
Externally publishedYes

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