Aeschylus' Legendary Head Trauma: Reflections on Pseudopathology and the Origins of Mythology

Antonio Perciaccante, Donatella Lippi, Alessia Coralli, Philippe Charlier, Otto Appenzeller, Francesco Maria Galassi, Elena Varotto, Raffaella Bianucci

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Cranial trauma was one of the most frequent pathological events in Ancient Greece, occurring mainly during athletic games or on the battlefield. In his epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey, Homer described 41 injuries of the head, face, and cervical spine.1 Here, we report one of the most famous cranial injuries due to an unusual accident: the head trauma that allegedly killed Aeschylus.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-31
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Aeschylus
  • Head Trauma
  • Psudopathology

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