Age differences in psychosocial predictors of positive and negative affect: A longitudinal investigation of young, midlife, and older adults

Timothy Windsor, Kaarin Anstey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Research has consistently shown that despite aging-related losses, older adults have high levels of emotional well-being relative to those in young and midlife adults. We aimed to contribute to knowledge around the factors that predict emotional well-being over the life course by examining age group differences in associations of positive and negative social exchanges and mastery beliefs with positive and negative affect in a sample of 7,472 young, midlife, and older adults assessed on 2 measurement occasions, 4 years apart. Results from structural equation models indicated lower levels of negative affect with advancing age. Mastery was consistently related to higher well-being, with the strongest associations evident for young adults. Older adults reported the most frequent positive and least frequent negative social exchanges; however, associations of social relations with affect tended to be stronger among young and midlife adults relative to older adults. Results are discussed in the context of life course perspectives on goal orientations and self-regulatory processes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)641-652
    Number of pages12
    JournalPsychology and Aging
    Volume25
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010

    Keywords

    • Mastery
    • Negative affect
    • Positive affect
    • Social relations

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Age differences in psychosocial predictors of positive and negative affect: A longitudinal investigation of young, midlife, and older adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this