An Archaeology of Institutional Confinement. The Hyde Park Barracks, 1848–1886 by Peter Davies, Penny Crook and Tim Murray

Susan Piddock

    Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationBook/Film/Article review

    Abstract

    In the last 20 years historical archaeologists have turned their focus to consider nineteenth and twentieth century institutions in England, America,
    New Zealand and Australia. Taking various forms (e.g. asylums, workhouses, prisons, schools and various ‘homes’), these institutions were often focused on the reform of the individual. The major difficulty facing archaeologists working within this area has been linking artefacts to the residents, whether inmates or staff. The Hyde Park Barracks presents a unique opportunity for archaeologists in that there is an extensive artefact collection, reasonably confined spaces where inmates and staff lived, and a limited time period of use for the building. This allows the artefacts to be securely linked to people inhabiting portions of the barracks.
    Original languageEnglish
    PagesS159-S160
    Number of pages2
    Volume80
    Specialist publicationAustralian Archaeology
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

    Keywords

    • archaeology
    • institutional confinement
    • artefacts

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