An effectiveness study of an integrated, community-based package for maternal, newborn, child and HIV care in South Africa: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Mark Tomlinson, Tanya Doherty, Debra Jackson, Joy E. Lawn, Petrida Ijumba, Mark Colvin, Lungiswa Nkonki, Emmanuelle Daviaud, Ameena Goga, David Sanders, Carl Lombard, Lars Åke Persson, Thoko Ndaba, Gail Snetro, Mickey Chopra

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Abstract

Background: Progress towards MDG4 in South Africa will depend largely on scaling up effective prevention against mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV and also addressing neonatal mortality. This imperative drives increasing focus on the neonatal period and particularly on the development and testing of appropriate models of sustainable, community-based care in South Africa in order to reach the poor. A number of key implementation gaps affecting progress have been identified. Implementation gaps for HIV prevention in neonates; implementation gaps for neonatal care especially home postnatal care; and implementation gaps for maternal mental health support. We have developed and are evaluating and costing an integrated and scaleable home visit package delivered by community health workers targeting pregnant and postnatal women and their newborns to provide essential maternal/newborn care as well as interventions for Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV.Methods: The trial is a cluster randomized controlled trial that is being implemented in Umlazi which is a peri-urban settlement with a total population of 1 million close to Durban in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. The trial consists of 30 randomized clusters (15 in each arm). A baseline survey established the homogeneity of clusters and neither stratification nor matching was performed. Sample size was based on increasing HIV-free survival from 74% to 84%, and calculated to be 120 pregnant women per cluster. Primary outcomes are higher levels of HIV free survival and levels of exclusive and appropriate infant feeding at 12 weeks postnatally. The intervention is home based with community health workers delivering two antenatal visits, a postnatal visit within 48 hours of birth, and a further four visits during the first two months of the infants life. We are undertaking programmatic and cost effectiveness analysis to cost the intervention.Discussion: The question is not merely to develop an efficacious package but also to identify and test delivery strategies that enable scaling up, which requires effectiveness studies in a health systems context, adapting and testing Asian community-based studies in various African contexts.Trial registration: ISRCTN: ISRCTN41046462.

Original languageEnglish
Article number236
JournalTrials
Volume12
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

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    Tomlinson, M., Doherty, T., Jackson, D., Lawn, J. E., Ijumba, P., Colvin, M., Nkonki, L., Daviaud, E., Goga, A., Sanders, D., Lombard, C., Persson, L. Å., Ndaba, T., Snetro, G., & Chopra, M. (2011). An effectiveness study of an integrated, community-based package for maternal, newborn, child and HIV care in South Africa: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials, 12, [236].