An experimental investigation of patch use by female monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus (L.)

C. M. BULL, M. P. ZALUCKI, Y. SUZUKI, D. A. MACKAY, R. L. KITCHING

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monarch butterflies, which breed throughout the year in southeastern Queensland, Australia, were studied in four dense milkweed patches during the winter months (June‐August) 1983. The percentage of marked females recaptured was measured in each of four 15‐day sampling periods. In patches where males were experimentally removed, female recapture rate decreased compared with patches which had the same density reduction but no change in sex ratio. There was a significant correlation between female recapture rate and the proportion of males in samples, but female recapture rate was not correlated with population density, the number of males, the number of females or the proportion of young butterflies in the samples. We propose that females assessed patch quality by the sex ratios, and left a patch sooner if encounter rate with males was low. Since males provide a nutrient ‘reward’ during copulation, they may be a limited resource for females during winter. An alternative interpretation, that females left a patch sooner when female density was higher, was not supported as strongly by the data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-398
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Journal of Ecology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1985

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An experimental investigation of patch use by female monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus (L.)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this