Analysis of health administration data to inform health service planning for paediatric palliative care

Alison Pauline Bowers, Natalie Bradford, Raymond Javan Chan, Anthony Herbert, Patsy Yates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Health service planning in paediatric palliative care is complex, with the diverse geographical and demographic characteristics adding to the challenge of developing services across different nations. Accurate and reliable data are essential to inform effective, efficient and equitable health services. Aim: To quantify health service usage by children and young people aged 0-21 years with a life-limiting condition admitted to hospital and health service facilities in Queensland, Australia during the 2011 and 2016 calendar years, and describe the clinical and demographic characteristics associated with health services usage. Design: Retrospective health administrative data linkage of clinical and demographic information with hospital admissions was extracted using International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) diagnostic codes. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Setting/participants: Individuals aged 0-21 years with a life-limiting condition admitted to a Queensland Public Hospital and Health Service or private hospital. Results: Hospital admissions increased from 17 955 in 2011 to 23 273 in 2016, an increase of 5318 (29.6%). The greatest percentage increase in admissions were for those aged 16-18 years (58.1%, n=1050), and those with non-oncological conditions (36.2%, n=4256). The greatest number of admissions by ICD-10-AM chapter for 2011 and 2016 were by individuals with neoplasms (6174, 34.4% and 7206, 31.0% respectively). Overall, the number of admissions by Indigenous children and young people increased by 70.2% (n=838). Conclusions: Administrative data are useful to describe clinical and demographic characteristics and quantify health service usage. Available data suggest a growing demand for health services by children eligible for palliative care that will require an appropriate response from health service planners.

Original languageEnglish
Article number002449
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Supportive and Palliative Care
Early online date13 Oct 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Oct 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chronic conditions
  • hospital care
  • paediatrics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Analysis of health administration data to inform health service planning for paediatric palliative care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this