Anti-inflammatory diterpenoids and other secondary metabolites from Dodonaea polyandra; a traditional medicine used by Kaanju people in North Eastern Australia.

Bradley Simpson, David Claudie, Jiping Wang, Jacobus Gerber, Nick Smith, Ross McKinnon, Susan Semple

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

Collaborative research guided by the traditional Indigenous knowledge of Northern Kaanju people, Cape York Peninsula, Australia has recently led to the isolation of four new clerodane diterpenoids from the leaves of Dodonaea polyandra (Sapindaceae). These compounds have shown high levels of anti-inflammatory activity in a TPA mouse ear oedema model of inflammation. Dose-response studies revealed compound CS004 (be-low) was the most potent of these displaying a linear dose-response relationship.
Percentage inhibition of oedema for this compound ranged from 44 to85% over the dose range 0.022 to 1.77mmol. The maximum percentage of 85% was comparable at an equimolar dose to the known synthetic steroid betamethasone (90%). The dose-response profiles of the other diterpenoids isolated which are structural analogues of CS004 were also evaluated, however the dose-response characteristics of these co-pounds were mound to be non-linear, with a tendency towards being U-shaped. Additional chemical investigations of the same plant revealed the presence of some flavonoid constituents. These findings add Wes-tern scientific evidence supporting the traditional use of the plant in traditional Northern Kaanju medicine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1226
JournalPLANTA MEDICA
Volume76
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event7th Tannin Conference (Presymposium)/58th International Congress and Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical Plant and Natural Product Research - Berlin, Germany
Duration: 29 Aug 20102 Sep 2010

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Anti-inflammatory diterpenoids and other secondary metabolites from Dodonaea polyandra; a traditional medicine used by Kaanju people in North Eastern Australia.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this