Anti‐Social Behaviour and Police Contact among 13‐ to 15‐Year‐old English Adolescents with and Without Mild/Moderate Intellectual Disability

Eric Emerson, Sarah Halpin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To describe the rates of anti-social behaviour (ASB) among adolescents with/without mild/moderate intellectual disability (MMID). To estimate whether any differences could be attributable to differences in exposure to extraneous risk factors. Design: Secondary analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. Methods: Participants with MMID were identified through data linkage with educational records. Results: Parents of children with MMID were more likely to report police contact, children with MMID were more likely to self-report fighting/public disturbance, shoplifting and graffiti. When controlling for differences in exposure to extraneous risk factors, MMID was associated with increased rates of police contact and self-reported graffiti, no difference in self-reported shoplifting, reduced rates of self-reported fighting/public disturbance and vandalism. Conclusions: Differences in the rates of exposure to extraneous risk factors play an important role in accounting for the differences in the prevalence of self-reported ASB among adolescents with and without MMID.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-369
Number of pages8
JournalJOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anti-social behaviour
  • Mild intellectual disabilities
  • Police

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