Association between change in body weight after midlife and risk of hip fracture?the Singapore Chinese Health Study

Z. Dai, L.-W. Ang, J.-M. Yuan, W.-P. Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: The relationship between change in body weight and risk of fractures is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. In this cohort of middle-aged to elderly Chinese in Singapore, compared to stable weight, weight loss ≥10 % over an average of 6 years is associated with nearly 40 % increase in risk of hip fracture. Introduction: Findings on the relationship between change in body weight and risk of hip fracture are inconsistent. In this study, we examined this association among middle-aged and elderly Chinese in Singapore. Methods: We used prospective data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women aged 45–74 years at recruitment in 1993–1998. Body weight and height were self-reported at recruitment and reassessed during follow-up interview in 1999–2004. Percent in weight change was computed based on the weight difference over an average of 6 years, and categorized as loss ≥10 %, loss 5 to <10 %, loss or gain <5 % (stable weight), gain 5 to <10 %, and gain ≥10 %. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied with adjustment for risk factors for hip fracture and body mass index (BMI) reported at follow-up interview. Results: About 12 % experienced weight loss ≥10 %, and another 12 % had weight gain ≥10 %. After a mean follow-up of 9.0 years, we identified 775 incident hip fractures among 42,149 eligible participants. Compared to stable weight, weight loss ≥10 % was associated with 39 % increased risk (hazard ratio 1.39; 95 % confidence interval 1.14, 1.69). Such elevated risk with weight loss ≥10 % was observed in both genders and age groups at follow-up (≤65 and >65 years) and in those with baseline BMI ≥20 kg/m2.There was no significant association with weight gain. Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence that substantial weight loss is an important risk factor for osteoporotic hip fractures among the middle-aged to elderly Chinese.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1939-1947
Number of pages9
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jul 2015

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Chinese
  • Hip fracture
  • Weight change

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