Associations Between Quality of Life and Outdoor Access in Nursing Homes: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Suzanne Dyer, Enwu Liu, Emmanuel Gnanamanickam, Stephanie Harrison, Rachel Milte, Maria Crotty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Associations between provision of independent access to outdoor areas
and frequency of Australian nursing home (NH) residents going outdoors with healthrelated quality of life (HR-QoL, EQ-5D-5L) are examined in a cross-sectional study (541
participants, 17 homes, 84% with cognitive impairment) using multilevel models. After
adjustments for potential confounders (including comorbidities and home location), independent access to outdoor areas was not associated with HR-QoL (β=-0.01, 95% CI,
-0.09–0.07). Going outdoors daily (β=0.13, 95% CI 0.06–0.21), but not multiple times a
week (β=0.03; 95% CI, -0.03–0.09), was associated with better HR-QoL. Residents living in small-scale, clustered, homelike facilities had greater odds of going outdoors daily
(odds ratio 15.1; 95% CI, 6.3–36.2). Provision of independent access to outdoor areas alone
may be insufficient to achieve HR-QoL benefits of NH residents venturing outdoors, in a
pre-COVID era. Staffing structures, organizational attitudes, environmental design, and
activities to support residents of NHs venturing outdoors frequently, despite any COVID19-related restrictions, are needed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of Long-Term Care
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • nursing homes
  • cognitive impairment
  • built environment
  • quality of life
  • dementia

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