Atomic Force Microscopy Applied to Biological Systems: Novel Applications and Advanced Experimental Methods

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has now existed for over 30 years and since its beginnings the method has been applied to a variety of biological systems and has demonstrated significant advantages over other forms of microscopy such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For example, AFM can provide high resolution topographic images in the samples native environment, which for many biological samples may be ambient or fluid conditions The technique has developed considerably since its inception and this chapter will focus on a number of technical advances in AFM, including some novel applications readers may not be aware of, that have taken place in the last 20 years. The application of these advances to a wide variety of biological materials will also be explored.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComprehensive Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
EditorsDavid L. Andrews, Robert H. Lipson, Thomas Nann
Place of PublicationAmsterdam
PublisherElsevier
Chapter3.05
Pages83-104
Number of pages22
Volume1-5
Edition2nd
ISBN (Electronic)9780128122952
ISBN (Print)978-0-12-812296-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • atomic force microscopy
  • biological species
  • Cantilever
  • imaging modes
  • mass sensing
  • scanning speed
  • tip
  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Imaging modes
  • Biological species
  • Scanning speed
  • Tip
  • Mass sensing

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