Attitudes toward high achievers and reactions to their fall: Theory and research concerning tall poppies

N. T. Feather

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    168 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract


    The research described in this chapter is concerned with tall poppies that are viewed impersonally from a distance rather than with tall poppies that are seen as rivals in situations where there is a struggle for achievement or power. The research is conducted to identify some of the variables that affect the attitudes toward tall poppies and the reaction to their fall. It investigated not only attitudes toward specific tall poppies who are high achievers but also attitudes toward tall poppies in general. This chapter describes some of the main sources for the theoretical ideas that guided the research program. The research program on tall poppies has involved both experimental and correlational studies. The chapter describes studies that used vignettes or scenarios in which the initial status of the stimulus person is experimentally manipulated and where this status declined as a result of performance or other factors. In addition, later studies investigated deservingness in more detail and cross-cultural differences. A second group of studies examined attitudes toward tall poppies in general and the correlates of these attitudes. These studies examined generalized attitudes toward high achievers, using a specially constructed scale called “the Tall Poppy Scale.” A third group of studies in research program has examined attitudes toward tall poppies that are highly visible public figures.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Social Psychology
    Pages1-73
    Number of pages73
    Volume26
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Publication series

    NameAdvances in Experimental Social Psychology
    ISSN (Print)0065-2601

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