Australian nurses’ suggestions for the management of violence in the workplace: ‘The people who make the policy are not the people on the floor’

Hila Ariela Dafny, Amanda Muller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim(s): To ascertain nurses’ perceptions about, and suggestions for, management solutions to workplace violence perpetrated by patients. Background: Violence towards nurses from patients in the workplace is high in Australia. There is a need for good management responses, and experienced nurses can provide logistical suggestions about effective strategies. Method(s): This study uses an exploratory qualitative design. Focus group interviews were undertaken with 23 nurses working in a regional public hospital in Queensland, Australia. The COREQ research reporting checklist was followed, and the qualitative data were transcribed and thematically analysed manually and by NVivo. Results: Policy implementation, training, staff movement, seclusion, debriefing and a full reporting cycle were identified as central themes. Workplace violence management happens before, during and after a violent event. Conclusion(s): Weak processes undermine management; staff training on de-escalation is needed. Affected staff need freedom to move from the ward. Better medical orders should be in place before an event. A full debriefing and feedback cycle are required, along with easier reporting processes. Implications for Nursing Management: Nursing management can reduce violence by ensuring better institutional support, consistent follow-up and complete feedback procedures. Legal support, follow-up mechanisms and staff training in de-escalation are key points.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Early online date21 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 May 2021

Keywords

  • Australia
  • nursing
  • organisation and administration
  • supervisory
  • workplace violence

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