Avoiding institutional outcomes for older adults living with disability: The use of community-based aged care supports

Caroline Ellison, Amy White, Libby Chapman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background Most people with a disability want to remain living in their own home as they age. Without additional support, people with a disability may not be able to avoid moving into residential aged care, attending day programs, or becoming isolated from participation in the wider community. This study examined whether participants perceived access to community-based aged care supports assisted with avoiding receiving more institutional models of service as they age. Method Qualitative research processes were used to explore the perceptions of 60 individuals with a disability aged 50 years and over, in relation to ageing and the value of community-based aged care. Results Findings indicated that participants receiving community-based aged care supports reported benefits including opportunities to develop relationships, maintain daily living skills and participate in community activities. Conclusion Due to a lack of confidence in the availability of access to mainstream community-based aged care services, many participants felt vulnerable or unsure about their future and ability to remain living in their own home. Several participants commented that this meant that an undesired early relocation into residential aged care or congregate disability services appeared inevitable.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)175-183
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
    Volume36
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2011

    Keywords

    • Ageing
    • Community-based aged care supports
    • Disability and ageing

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