Becoming Accepted: the complementary and alternative medicine practitioner's response to the uptake and practice of traditional medicine therapies by the mainstream health sector

Marlene Wiese, Candice Oster

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This Australian study sought to understand how practitioners of the traditional systems of what is now termed complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are responding to the adoption of their traditional medicine therapies by the mainstream health care system, and the practice of these therapies by mainstream health care practitioners. A grounded theory approach was used for this study. In-depth interviews were conducted with 19 participants who were non-mainstream practitioners from five traditional systems of medicine-Traditional Chinese Medicine,Ayurveda, Naturopathy, Homeopathy and Western Herbal Medicine. Four main conceptual categories were identified: Losing Control of the CAM Occupational Domain (the participants' main concern); Personal Positioning; Professional Positioning (the core category); and Legitimacy.These categories formed the elements of the substantive theory of 'becoming accepted' as a legitimate health care provider in the mainstream health system, which explained the basic social process that the study's participants were using to resolve their main concern.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)415-433
    Number of pages19
    JournalHealth: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine
    Volume14
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • Complementary and alternative medicine
    • Grounded theory
    • Profession and professionalization

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