Becoming Professionals in Inclusive Education Settings: Perspectives from Ghanaian Social Work Students on Their Motivations

Hajara Bentum, Alhassan Abdullah, Enoch Boafo Amponsah, Ebenezer Cudjoe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The research literature highlights the need for helping professionals such as Social Workers, psychologists, counsellors and support staff in the successful implementation of inclusive education. As a result of this, national policies on inclusive education in Ghana mention the involvement of Social Workers in inclusive schools (schools practising inclusive education). However, there are no reported studies about the presence of Social Workers in inclusive schools in Ghana. In response to this, a qualitative study was conducted to explore the views of 15 final year social work students undertaking an elective on working with disability at a city-based university in Ghana about their motivations to practice in inclusive education settings. Data from the in-depth interviews were coded following thematic analysis. The students reported prior knowledge, professional demands, passion for the profession, quest to prevent discrimination and adequate resources as their motivations to practice in inclusive schools. The study findings suggest that Social Workers’ passion or desire to address discriminatory practices and the presence of adequate material and financial resources are key motivating elements. The Social Work curriculum in universities should also draw much attention in developing students’ knowledge and skills in working with students with disabilities in mainstream schools.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-143
Number of pages15
JournalPractice
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ghana
  • inclusive education
  • motivations
  • social work students
  • social workers

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Becoming Professionals in Inclusive Education Settings: Perspectives from Ghanaian Social Work Students on Their Motivations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this