‘Being together really helped’: Australian transgender and non-binary people and their animal companions living through violence and marginalisation

Shoshana Rosenberg, Damien W. Riggs, Nik Taylor, Heather Fraser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the intersections of human and animal lives in the context of violence and marginalisation. It draws on two studies, the first involving a sub-sample of 23 open-ended survey responses completed by transgender and non-binary (TNB) people taken from a larger study exploring the intersections of animal- and human-directed violence, and the second involving eight interviews with TNB people focused on the meaning of animal companionship. Together, the findings suggest that animal companionship can be a protective factor for TNB people experiencing marginalisation and/or distress, whether in the context of domestic violence and abuse (DVA) or in the context of other forms of intra- or inter-personal points or adversity. The findings suggest that animal companions can provide TNB people with comfort and non-judgemental emotional interactions in the face of DVA and other life stressors. However, the risk of violence directed towards animals must also be considered. The article concludes with discussion of the implications for DVA service provision and research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-590
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Sociology
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • animal companions
  • animals
  • domestic violence < violence
  • LGBT
  • non-binary
  • transgender

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