Beliefs about the self-regulation of learning predict cognitive and metacognitive strategies and academic performance in pre-service teachers

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Abstract

The research investigated relationships amongst beliefs about the self-regulation of learning (SRL), study strategies and academic performance in 366 pre-service teachers. A Beliefs about Learning and Teaching (BALT) Questionnaire was used to examine beliefs that were both consistent and inconsistent with SRL. The final model emerging from the structural equation analysis showed that beliefs consistent with SRL were positive predictors of the self-reported use of cognitive and metacognitive strategies, while beliefs inconsistent with SRL were negative predictors. The use of cognitive and metacognitive strategies was in turn a positive predictor of the pre-service teachers’ academic performance. About 50% of the teachers simultaneously agreed with statements indicating beliefs consistent and inconsistent with SRL. We argue that the co-existence of beliefs consistent and inconsistent with SRL undermines the use of cognitive and metacognitive strategies in pre-service teachers, with negative effects on their academic performance. It is suggested that interventions to support teachers to promote metacognition and SRL can be more effective if they address preservice teachers’ beliefs that are not consistent with SRL and especially beliefs in transmissive teaching.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages32
JournalMetacognition and Learning
Early online date2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2021

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • Cognitive strategies and metacognitive strategies
  • ICAP
  • Learning strategies
  • Pre-service teachers
  • Self-regulated learning

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