Beswick Creek Cave six decades later: change and continuity in the rock art of Doria Gudaluk

Claire Smith, I Domingo, Gary Jackson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    rock art of Doria Gudaluk (Beswick Creek Cave) in the Northern Territory of Australia has previously provided a valuable lesson in the difficulties of definitive interpretation without local knowledge. Now, newly recorded motifs at the site - some only visible with digital enhancement - highlight the dangers of relating stylistic changes to the replacement of different cultures. When considered in the context of local history, developments in the rock art of Doria Gudaluk during the second half of the twentieth century can be understood as the result of new cultural collaborations between incoming groups and older, local communities.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1613-1628
    Number of pages16
    JournalAntiquity
    Volume90
    Issue number354
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

    Keywords

    • Aboriginal
    • Australia
    • Northern Territory
    • rock art
    • style
    • twentieth century

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