Better judgement: The serendipity of training assessors about judgement biases

L Schmidt, L Schuwirth, S King

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

    Abstract

    Introduction:
    Human judgement is the method for ensuring valid assessment in certain areas but it is subject to judgement biases. Biases are not prejudices, instead, they are misrepresentations in the assessor’s mind of what occurred during the assessment exercise. Any bias might impact on an assessor’s judgement of a student and shift grades up or down which implies that biases are bad and we should try to train assessors to avoid them; but should we and can we? Biases seem to enable a reduction of cognitive load and may therefore be useful in making judgements, especially in the real-world, complex environment of practice-based assessment. The purpose of this study is to better understand the value of our perspective on biases in assessment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages18-18
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    EventOttawa and ANZAHPE (Australian and New Zealand Association for Health Professional Educators) Conference 2016: Assessment in Medicine and the healthcare professions - Perth Convention and exhibition Centre, Perth, Australia
    Duration: 19 Mar 201623 Mar 2016
    https://www.anzahpe.org/Past-Conferences (List of past conferences, including 2016)
    https://www.anzahpe.org/resources/Documents/Conference/Past%20Conference%20documentation/Ottawa%20Abstracts%202016.pdf (2016 Book of Abstracts)

    Conference

    ConferenceOttawa and ANZAHPE (Australian and New Zealand Association for Health Professional Educators) Conference 2016
    Abbreviated titleOttawa 2016/ANZAHPE 2016
    CountryAustralia
    CityPerth
    Period19/03/1623/03/16
    Internet address

    Keywords

    • conference abstract
    • conference presentation
    • Ottawa conference
    • Australian & New Zealand Association for Health Professional Educators (ANZAHPE)
    • Human judgement
    • judgement biases
    • practice-based assessment
    • biases in assessment.
    • perspectives on biases in assessment.

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