Bongs and baby boomers: Trends in cannabis use among older Australians

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the prevalence and predictors of cannabis use among older Australians and discuss implications for service provision. Methods: Secondary analyses were conducted on the 2004 and 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey, a large and nationally representative data set. Frequency analyses explored the distribution of demographic characteristics and cannabis use. Logistic regression explored the predictors of cannabis use. Results: Cannabis use among Australians aged 50 years and over increased significantly (P < 0.01) from 1.5% to 3.6% between 2004 and 2013. Cannabis use was significantly (P < 0.01) more likely among those who were male, unmarried, risky drinkers, smokers and poly-drug users, and significantly less likely among those who were older. Conclusion: This increase in cannabis use among older Australians has important implications for policy and practice. Healthcare services and professionals need the skills to be able to effectively support older cannabis users. Targeted, age-appropriate interventions are similarly required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-59
Number of pages4
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • aged
  • cannabis
  • public health

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