Boundary layer structures and the role of breezes in forcing deep island convection

R. E. Carbone, T. D. Keenan, J. W. Wilson, J. M. Hacker

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The C-POL Doppler-polarimetric radar, a Flinders Cessna 340 aircraft, a mesonet of 15 automatic weather stations, three ultrahigh-frequency wind profilers, and serial soundings were used to examine the evolution of convective forcing from the development of sea breezes to the organization of small squalls at the Tiwi Islands. Early sea breezes develop on narrow peninsulas and often `collide' from opposing shores, initiating much of the early precipitating convection on the islands. Island-scale breezes, however, routinely play a major role in the subsequent forcing of deep convection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages565-566
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1997 28th Conference on Radar Meteorology - Austin, TX, USA
Duration: 7 Sep 199712 Sep 1997

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 1997 28th Conference on Radar Meteorology
CityAustin, TX, USA
Period7/09/9712/09/97

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    Carbone, R. E., Keenan, T. D., Wilson, J. W., & Hacker, J. M. (1997). Boundary layer structures and the role of breezes in forcing deep island convection. 565-566. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1997 28th Conference on Radar Meteorology, Austin, TX, USA, .