Bringing together humanistic and intergroup perspectives to build a model of internalisation of normative social harmdoing

Catherine E. Amiot, Morgana Lizzio-Wilson, Emma F. Thomas, Winnifred R. Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article introduces a model of the internalisation of normative social harmdoing: the MINSOH. This model seeks to explain how group members internalise harmful social norms such that they personally endorse their groups' normative actions. To this aim, the MINSOH integrates two divergent yet complementary theoretical perspectives: self-determination theory and the social identity approach. These perspectives differ in their basic assumptions about the possibility for harm to become internalised, yet when integrated, they provide a powerful account of how harmdoing can become internalised. The MINSOH proposes specific conditions under which harmful normative actions become accepted by group members. This article outlines multiple self-determined motivations for harmdoing and discrete group processes that enable harmdoing to be internalised and autonomously enacted, and reviews factors that facilitate (i.e., strong/unique/comparative social identification; endorsement of ideological justifications) and block the internalisation process (presence of multiple identities/diverging norms; inclusive superordinate identity). Directions for future research are then discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-504
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2020

Keywords

  • intergroup harmdoing
  • intergroup relations
  • internalisation
  • norms
  • self-determination
  • social identity

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