Can an increase in noradrenaline induced by brief exercise counteract sleep inertia?

Katya Kovac, Grace E. Vincent, Jessica L. Paterson, Brad Aisbett, Amy C. Reynolds, Sally A. Ferguson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Emergency responders often credit ‘adrenaline’ (i.e. sympathetic activity) as the reason they respond quickly upon waking, unimpaired by sleep inertia. Movement upon waking may promote sympathetic activity in this population. This pilot study (n = 4 healthy males) tested the effects of a 30 s exercise bout (maximal sprint) upon waking during the night (02:00 h) on sympathetic activity and sleep inertia. When compared to sedentary conditions, exercise reduced subjective sleepiness levels and elicited a temporary increase in sympathetic activity, measured by plasma noradrenaline levels. These findings provide preliminary support for exercise as a potential sleep inertia countermeasure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1474-1478
Number of pages5
JournalChronobiology International
Volume37
Issue number9-10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • noradrenaline
  • sleep inertia
  • sympathetic activity
  • waking

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