Can systemic myokine response to an acute exercise bout predict high and low responders to resistance training?

Leo Bell, Matthew Wallen, Scott W. Talpey, Brendan O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Resistance training is performed to increase muscle strength and mass. Associated benefits relate to improvements in physical performance as well as reduced risk of mortality. However, the exercise response to resistance training is largely variable. This may be attributed to individual physiological phenotype and flawed methods of standardised training. Recent efforts have been made to identify biomarkers which delineate between high and low responders to resistance training. Myokines associated with exercise-induced muscle secretome are biomarkers that potentially differentiate between individuals that experience large or small increases in muscle mass. However, the repeatability of these biomarkers in response to standardised resistance training is understudied. Therefore, this research seeks to address the inter and intra-reliability of myokines associated with resistance exercise, and if they confidently predict high and low responders to individually standardised resistance training. Development of a screening tool which reliably identifies individual trainability can have potential implications for personalised exercise physiology.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110780
Number of pages4
JournalMedical Hypotheses
Volume160
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • myokines
  • Cytokines
  • Hypertrophy
  • Trainability
  • Strength training

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