Caring for a person experiencing pain

Caroline Phelan, Tracy Levett-Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In this chapter, you will be introduced to Mrs Grace Simpson, a 74-yearold
woman admitted to hospital with a hip fracture following a fall at
home. It is the therapeutic management of Mrs Simpson’s pain, both in
the acute care setting and following discharge, that is the focus of the
two scenarios.
For many years, pain was accepted as inevitable, and indifference to its
seriousness was common. Contemporary approaches to pain now
recognise that effective pain management is a fundamental human right
and integral to ethical, professional and cost-effective clinical practice
(Macintyre et al., 2010). Pain management requires sophisticated clinical
reasoning skills, a sound knowledge base, highly developed clinical skills
and a commitment to person-centred care.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClinical Reasoning
Subtitle of host publicationLearning to Think Like a Nurse
EditorsTracy Levett-Jones
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherPearson
Chapter4
Pages50-72
Number of pages23
Edition2
ISBN (Electronic)9781488616464
ISBN (Print)9781488616396
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Pain management
  • Nursing care

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  • Cite this

    Phelan, C., & Levett-Jones, T. (2017). Caring for a person experiencing pain. In T. Levett-Jones (Ed.), Clinical Reasoning: Learning to Think Like a Nurse (2 ed., pp. 50-72). Pearson.